Plasma Synthesis of Quantum Dots - ResearchGate | …

Bovine, murine and porcine -lactalbumin genes have all been sequenced and their proteins have molecular weights of about 14 kD. -Lactalbumin is produced at a concentration of approximately 0.2 to 1.8 mg/ml in the milk of most mammals. It is synthesized in the rough endoplasmic reticulum and passes to the Golgi complex where it interacts with GT. In the mammary Golgi apparatus, -LA combines with G and alters the substrate specificity of galactosyltransferase from -acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) to glucose. This modified complex transfers galactose to glucose rather than to -acetylglucosamine.

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Some unique advantages of plasma-arc furnace technology for industrial use include the following.

Low-temperature plasma synthesis of carbon …

ß1,4 Galactosyltransferase (GT) is the enzymatic subunit of lactose synthase. It is a glycoprotein with a molecular weight varying from 35-60 kDa, depending upon the amount of glycosylation and the degree of proteolytic degradation. ß1,4 Galactosyltransferase in milk is proteolytically clipped removing the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains. The GT found in milk has a molecular weight of 35-45 kDa. Without the presence of -lactalbumin, the enzyme functions in the Golgi during glycoprotein biosynthesis to add galactose to oligosaccharides with terminal -acetylglucosamine residues in a ß1-->4 linkage. The GT transfers galactose from the donor, UDP-galactose, to the terminal -acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) acceptor on the oligosaccharise complex of glycosylated proteins. Galactosyltransferase is found in most tissues of the body. It is only found on the inner surface of the Golgi apparatus.

Induction plasma synthesis of fullerenes and nanotubes …

ß1,4 Galactosyltransferase is unique among all glycosyltransferases in that its substrate specificity can be modified by addition of -lactalbumin. Together, ß1,4 galactosyltransferase and -lactalbumin form the lactose synthase complex. Because -lactalbumin is only expressed in the mammary gland, lactose synthesis only occurs in the mammary gland. In addition, expression of the -lactalbumin gene is closely regulated by hormones, so that lactose synthesis only occurs during the lactating state of the tissue.

Thermal plasma synthesis of nanotitania and its characterization 243.

Proteins are polymers of amino acids. Twenty different types of amino acids occur naturally in proteins. Proteins differ from each other according to the type, number and sequence of amino acids that make up the polypeptide backbone. As a result they have different molecular structures, nutritional attributes and physiochemical properties. Proteins are important constituents of foods for a number of different reasons. They are a major source of , as well as containing essential amino-acids, such as lysine, tryptophan, methionine, leucine, isoleucine and valine, which are essential to human health, but which the body cannot synthesize. Proteins are also the major structural components of many natural foods, often determining their overall texture, tenderness of meat or fish products. Isolated proteins are often used in foods as ingredients because of their unique functional properties, their ability to provide desirable appearance, texture or stability. Typically, proteins are used as gelling agents, emulsifiers, foaming agents and thickeners. Many food proteins are enzymes which are capable of enhancing the rate of certain biochemical reactions. These reactions can have either a favorable or detrimental effect on the overall properties of foods. Food analysts are interested in knowing the total concentration, type, molecular structure and functional properties of the proteins in foods.

In addition, the advantages of ..

N2 - Low pressure silane plasmas are known for their ability to synthesize silicon nanoparticles via gas phase nucleation. While in the past this particle formation has often been considered from the viewpoint of a contamination problem in semiconductor processing, we here describe a silane low pressure plasma that enables the synthesis of highly oriented, cubic-shaped silicon nanocrystals with a rather monodisperse size distribution. These silicon nanocubes have successfully been used in the manufacture of single nanoparticle vertical transistors. We discuss the advantages of this new paradigm of building nanoelectronic devices. The plasma synthesis process is characterized in more detail than in prior work. The particle nucleation, growth and shape evolution are studied. Results indicate that the process provides two spatially distinct zones: a diffuse plasma for particle growth and a constricted plasma zone for particle annealing. Measurements of the plasma ion density using a capacitive probe suggest that the plasma density in the constricted region of the plasma is about an order of magnitude higher than in the diffuse region, likely aiding the formation of cubic silicon nanocrystals. The process of particle extraction from the plasma reactor is discussed based on the balance of various forces acting on the particles. It is found that the use of a critical orifice for particle extraction enables the detrapping of particles which carry as many as 35 elementary charges.

ARPA-E | Microwave-Plasma Ammonia Synthesis

AB - Low pressure silane plasmas are known for their ability to synthesize silicon nanoparticles via gas phase nucleation. While in the past this particle formation has often been considered from the viewpoint of a contamination problem in semiconductor processing, we here describe a silane low pressure plasma that enables the synthesis of highly oriented, cubic-shaped silicon nanocrystals with a rather monodisperse size distribution. These silicon nanocubes have successfully been used in the manufacture of single nanoparticle vertical transistors. We discuss the advantages of this new paradigm of building nanoelectronic devices. The plasma synthesis process is characterized in more detail than in prior work. The particle nucleation, growth and shape evolution are studied. Results indicate that the process provides two spatially distinct zones: a diffuse plasma for particle growth and a constricted plasma zone for particle annealing. Measurements of the plasma ion density using a capacitive probe suggest that the plasma density in the constricted region of the plasma is about an order of magnitude higher than in the diffuse region, likely aiding the formation of cubic silicon nanocrystals. The process of particle extraction from the plasma reactor is discussed based on the balance of various forces acting on the particles. It is found that the use of a critical orifice for particle extraction enables the detrapping of particles which carry as many as 35 elementary charges.