Amputation and Prosthetics: Description, Causes and …

Background. The factors that determine successful rehabilitation after lower limb amputation have been widely investigated in the literature, but little attention has been paid to the type of prosthesis and clinical state of the residual limb, particularly the presence of open ulcers. Aim. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a vacuum-assisted socket system (VASS) in a sample of trans-tibial amputees with wounds or ulcers on the stump and to evaluate prosthesis use as a primary outcome. Secondary outcome measures were mobility with the prosthesis, pain associated with prosthesis use, and wound/ulcer healing. Study design. Randomized controlled study. Setting. Inpatient. Population. Twenty dysvascular transtibial amputees suffering from ulcers due to prosthesis use or delayed wound healing post-amputation were enrolled. Methods. Participants were separated into two groups: the experimental group was trained to use a VASS prosthesis in the presence of open ulcers/wounds on the stump; and the control group was trained to use a standard suction socket system prosthesis following ulcers/wounds healing. Results. At the end of the 12-week rehabilitation program, all VASS users were able to walk independently with their prosthesis as reflected by a median Locomotor Capability Index (LCI) value of 42, whereas only five participants in the control group were able to walk independently with a median LCI value of 21. At the two-month follow-up, the participants used their VASS prostheses for 62 hours a week (median; range: 0-91), which was significantly longer than the control group using the standard prosthesis for 5 hours per week (range: 0-56, p=0.003). At the six-month follow-up, the difference between VASS-users (80, range: 0-112 hours a weeks) and control-users (59, range: 0-91) was no longer significant (p=0.191). Despite more intense use of the prosthesis, pain and wound healing did not significantly differ between the two groups. Conclusion. These results showed that the VASS prosthesis allowed early fitting with prompt ambulation recovery without inhibiting wound healing or increasing pain.

Amputation, Prosthesis Use, and Phantom ..

adaptation to amputation and prosthesis use

Adaptation to Amputation and Prosthesis Use | …

N2 - Background. The factors that determine successful rehabilitation after lower limb amputation have been widely investigated in the literature, but little attention has been paid to the type of prosthesis and clinical state of the residual limb, particularly the presence of open ulcers. Aim. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a vacuum-assisted socket system (VASS) in a sample of trans-tibial amputees with wounds or ulcers on the stump and to evaluate prosthesis use as a primary outcome. Secondary outcome measures were mobility with the prosthesis, pain associated with prosthesis use, and wound/ulcer healing. Study design. Randomized controlled study. Setting. Inpatient. Population. Twenty dysvascular transtibial amputees suffering from ulcers due to prosthesis use or delayed wound healing post-amputation were enrolled. Methods. Participants were separated into two groups: the experimental group was trained to use a VASS prosthesis in the presence of open ulcers/wounds on the stump; and the control group was trained to use a standard suction socket system prosthesis following ulcers/wounds healing. Results. At the end of the 12-week rehabilitation program, all VASS users were able to walk independently with their prosthesis as reflected by a median Locomotor Capability Index (LCI) value of 42, whereas only five participants in the control group were able to walk independently with a median LCI value of 21. At the two-month follow-up, the participants used their VASS prostheses for 62 hours a week (median; range: 0-91), which was significantly longer than the control group using the standard prosthesis for 5 hours per week (range: 0-56, p=0.003). At the six-month follow-up, the difference between VASS-users (80, range: 0-112 hours a weeks) and control-users (59, range: 0-91) was no longer significant (p=0.191). Despite more intense use of the prosthesis, pain and wound healing did not significantly differ between the two groups. Conclusion. These results showed that the VASS prosthesis allowed early fitting with prompt ambulation recovery without inhibiting wound healing or increasing pain.

The experience of amputation and prosthesis use for …

AB - Background. The factors that determine successful rehabilitation after lower limb amputation have been widely investigated in the literature, but little attention has been paid to the type of prosthesis and clinical state of the residual limb, particularly the presence of open ulcers. Aim. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a vacuum-assisted socket system (VASS) in a sample of trans-tibial amputees with wounds or ulcers on the stump and to evaluate prosthesis use as a primary outcome. Secondary outcome measures were mobility with the prosthesis, pain associated with prosthesis use, and wound/ulcer healing. Study design. Randomized controlled study. Setting. Inpatient. Population. Twenty dysvascular transtibial amputees suffering from ulcers due to prosthesis use or delayed wound healing post-amputation were enrolled. Methods. Participants were separated into two groups: the experimental group was trained to use a VASS prosthesis in the presence of open ulcers/wounds on the stump; and the control group was trained to use a standard suction socket system prosthesis following ulcers/wounds healing. Results. At the end of the 12-week rehabilitation program, all VASS users were able to walk independently with their prosthesis as reflected by a median Locomotor Capability Index (LCI) value of 42, whereas only five participants in the control group were able to walk independently with a median LCI value of 21. At the two-month follow-up, the participants used their VASS prostheses for 62 hours a week (median; range: 0-91), which was significantly longer than the control group using the standard prosthesis for 5 hours per week (range: 0-56, p=0.003). At the six-month follow-up, the difference between VASS-users (80, range: 0-112 hours a weeks) and control-users (59, range: 0-91) was no longer significant (p=0.191). Despite more intense use of the prosthesis, pain and wound healing did not significantly differ between the two groups. Conclusion. These results showed that the VASS prosthesis allowed early fitting with prompt ambulation recovery without inhibiting wound healing or increasing pain.

OBJECTIVE: To detect the use of a prosthetic leg and the return to work in amputees Fifteen amputations were above the knee and 11 below the knee.

The use of bone bridges in transtibial amputations - …

The radius is one of the 2 long bones that make up your forearm, running from the wrist to the elbow. Transradial amputation is the partial amputation of the arm below the elbow, at some point along the radial bone. This type of surgery leaves your elbow and most of your arm intact, which makes recovery easier and makes it more likely that you will be able to continue to use your arm even after the amputation.

Amputation is the removal of an injured or diseased body part

Amputation | Prosthesis | Amputation - Scribd